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about what can and should be done. we are glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and brought to you by the aarp foundation. >> wk kellogg foundation. improving the lives of a vulnerable children. wkkf.org. >> of the annie e. casey foundation, helping build a better future for america's kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: even before the name -- numbers came out, we decided to spend some time getting to know the people behind the pottering -- poverty statistics. cornel west joined us. in tonight's episode, we call this one suffering, we look at what
to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the clandestine operation and the administration's push to punish iran with new sanctions. >> brown: then, we examine the economic and social fall-out from alabama's tough new immigration law. >> woodruff: margaret warner reports on the visit of south korea's president lee as he and president obama celebrate a new trade deal and consider how to rein in north korea's nuclear ambitions. >> with north korea you never have a good option. the worse options is to leave them alone and to let their nuclear missile program go completely unabated for four years of obama. >> brown: ray suarez explores fascinating new research on the genetic makeup of the bubonic plague that killed millions of europeans in the middle ages. >> woodruff: and tom clarke of i.t.n. reports from the remote highlands of colombia, where half the population will inherit early onset alzheimers disease. >> these families' plight has come to attention of the ou
is here. he is out in a timely film about wall street called "margin call ." we are glad you joined us. coming up, right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: alfredo quinones- hinojosa is a renowned neurosurgeon and director of the pituitary tumor center at johns hopkins. his remarkable path from mexico to the united states is the subject of a new memoir, "becoming dr. q: my journey from migrant farm worker to brain surgeon." an honor to have you on this program. i just want to touch this hand. >> i am hon
evening and thanks for joining us. google shares take flight after hours, jumping over $30 a share, susie, after the web giant crushed analyst estimates with its latest earnings. >> susie: tom, profits surged 26% and revenues posted an even bigger gain. here's how the numbers stacked up. google earned $2.7 billion, or $9.72 a share, almost a dollar ahead of analyst's estimates. revenues were also better than expected, up 33% to $7.5 billion. >> tom: joining us with more-- scott kessler. he follows google as senior director of technology research at s&p capital iq. with us tonight in new york. scott, how do you describe these quarterly results from google, blew estimates out of the water. >> yeah, tom, i would say having covered the stock for more than seven years, probably between good and great. google over the years has really delivered time and time again. this quarter was no exception. what was surprising to us was the combination of accelerating revenue growth for the fourth straight quarter as well as continuing improvement in margins reflecting well controlled costs and expenses. t
to the global economy. if not, they might sink into a global recession. >> we have heard the u.s. say that europe must get its act together and putting extreme pressure on them reaching a solution. is there anything the u.s. can do in practical terms at this point? >> know. from the point of european leaders, it is pretty rich to hear tim geithner telling them what to do. i think what is different in europe is that the banking sector is much bigger. this is four times the size of the u.s. banking sector. the sovran crisis is much bigger. the stakes are higher and many governments have to come together. -- the sovereign crisis is much higher. >> thank you for joining us. rescue workers in turkey are continuing to search for survivors from the earthquake. two people have been pulled out from the rubble. one of them is a university student and was found alive 60 hours after the earthquake. rescue workers broke into the floor as he emerged from the debris. our correspondent sent this report. >> slowly they are digging down into the heart of the masses of concrete that were once people's h
, they might sink into recession and take the rest of us with them. >> we have heard the u.s. say that you're past to get their act together. is any thing that the u.s. can do in practical terms at this point? >> no. from the point of view of european leaders, it is a pretty rich to hear tim geithner telling them what to do. the u.s. did act quickly after their own financial crisis. the banking sector is four times the size of the u.s. banking sector. this often crisis is much bigger, the stakes are much higher. this is a much more difficult situation. much more complex. >> thank you. >> in turkey, rescue workers are continuing to search for survivors from the earthquake. two people have been pulled from the rubble. one of them is a university student that was found alive 60 hours after the earthquake struck. rescue workers broke into applause as he emerged from the debris. our correspondent sent this report. >> slowly, they are digging down into the heart of the masses of concrete that were once people's homes. they are pulling away the masonry piece by piece. four days on, they have hear
guy, towards the person who didn't know how to use a computer. i think you don't often see that in other companies. i have covered a lot of these companies. i don't think they really take the care. he really did care. he was a difficult boss at times, people will tell you that. but he had a way of bringing people up to do their best work. people would say yeah, he was difficult but he's a genius. his head designer came up with amazing designs. they worked closely together where, in away, technology takes a backstage to the thing you want to use it for. so people would fall in love with the device. they could make it theirs. >> you think his death marks the end of an era? >> i really do. i have sat and listened to him unvail a product now over a dozen times. and there was something about him. i was at apple the day before he died. they unvailed the iphone 4 s. tim cook got up there. he has a nice way about him, but he's not steve jobs. there was something about the passion that steve had that just came through. i don't think we will see that again, you know. >> tim cook, he
auspices bbc world news america. billionaire behind bars. the u.s. -- what this sentence for insider trading. workers snatched from the largest refugee camp. and the chilean miners celebrate one year after their rescue. their fate has not always been so mary. -- so merry. welcome to our viewers on pbs and around the globe. today raj rajaratnam was sentenced for his role in one of the biggest insider-trading cases in history. they had pushed for 25 years. the judge issued a warning to anyone tempted to follow the same path. we were in the courtroom and sent this report. >> it is hard to believe that raj rajaratnam was once little- known outside the world of wall street hedge funds before he came a poster boy for crimes that judge described as a virus in our business culture that needs to be eradicated. the drama played out inside this manhattan courthouse in room 17 b. he has only a few weeks before he must report to prison on november 28. down the road on wall street, they have been watching closely. raj rajaratnam was accused of making $50 million running an insider-trad
for his safety. there have been acts of kindness. >> thank you so much for joining us. the u.s. secretary of state calls it a dangerous escalation, a senior u.s. centers said it may be an act of war. the alleged iranian plot to kill the saudi ambassador to washington had american officials fuming today. hillary clinton also warned the government will be held accountable. the u.s. has charged two iranians. >> this is the organization at the heart of the u.s. allegations. iran's revolutionary guards corps. it is the most powerful institution in iran. inside the guard corp. is a smaller group, special operations. americus says that this man, manssor arbabsiar, has admitted being hired by the force to carry out a first ever attack inside the united states. >> it is an outrageous act and the iranians will have to be held accountable. when you see the case presented, you will find there is compelling evidence for the assertion been made from local sources. >> his -- here is the target of the plot. saudi arabia's ambassador to the united states, adel al-jubeir. and theburden of proof hama amount
but over, and pledged to pull out u.s. forces by the end of this year. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> woodruff: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we excerpt the president's remarks; and margaret warner talks with white house deputy national security advisor denis mcdonough about the coming draw-down . >> woodruff: then, we ask libya's ambassador to the u.s., ali suleiman aujali, about the questions surrounding moammar qaddafi's death and what's next for his country. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and paul solman talks to author michael lewis about his new book, a travelogue of sorts about nations hit hard by the financial crisis. >> all these different societies were faced with exactly the same temptation-- free money. they behaved radically differently from one another. why? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it'
the stock. >> tom: then, talking tough on trade to boost the u.s. economy. >> i want to see fair trade policies, and if they're not going to be fair, you cut it off or you tax the hell out of them. >> tom: coming up, our interview with real estate mogul donald trump. it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 20. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt in new york. it's solid sales for microsoft in the company's most recent quarter. >> suzanne: tom, firms are buying microsoft's office and server software, and that business offset weak consumer demand for p.c.s. microsoft earned 68 cents a share in its fiscal first quarter, in line with wall street forecasts. revenues, however, were a bit better than expected, coming in at $17.3 billion. >> tom: microsoft shares traded slightly lower aft
that ended his life, but colonel gaddafi is dead after this. this rebel fighter told us he and a select group had known for a number of days that the former dictator was holed up, but they had kept the information secret. "-- >> if we had revealed the secret, anything could have happened. gaddafi might have tried to escape just as a woman or even committed suicide. >> more than 24 hours after his death, colonel gaddafi still lay unburied. the people are trying to rebuild their country and to leave libya still needs to be convinced that the former dictator is finally gone. >> the libyan people do not believe that he is dead. >> pictures are also now emerging that throw into question the circumstances surrounding the death of colonel gaddafi's son. the pictures taken shortly after his capture show him i lied and relatively relaxed. but his bullet-scarred body in the freezer shows a different story. -- the pictures taken shortly after his capture show him alive and relatively relaxed. more from the corner will conduct a post-mortem pyridine national transitional council maintains gaddafi was kil
america" reporting from washington. a 11 years in prison. the longest sentence in u.s. history for insider trading. kidnapped at gunpoint. aids workers are snatched from the world's largest refugee camp. and chilean miners celebrate one year after their rescue. their fate has not always been so merry. welcome to our viewers around the globe. once a high-flying financier, today he was sentenced to 11 years in prison for his role in one of the biggest insider- trading cases in american history. prosecutors wished for 25 years. the judge issued a clear warning for anyone tempted to follow the same path. our reporter was inside the courtroom in new york and send this report. >> he was once little known outside the world of wall street hedge funds. that was before he committed a crime the judge described as a virus in the business culture that needs to be eradicated. the drama that played out in front of this manhattan courthouse had him saying little as he waited to learn his fate. he has only a few weeks before he must report to prison on november 28. down the road on wall street, they have b
steve has had. even the president used water to show condolences'. -- used twitter to show condolences'. >> he had a tremendous charisma, and he believed things so passionately that you would believe them. >> steve jobs, adopted as a baby and later a college dropout, was always determined to follow its own path. more than 30 years ago with apple's co-founder steve wozniak he said out to bring personal computers into the home. >> almost any time we had discussions about how something should be done, he was almost always right. >> the drive for perfection made him a demanding colleague, but he persuaded consumers to pay top prices for gadgets like the iphone and the ipad that look and often worked better than their rivals. and when he was forced out of apple for more than a decade, it changed another industry with picks are. he pioneered the animation unit. he tells students at stanford university that facing death brought things into focus. >> your time is limited, so do not waste living someone else's life. do not be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's
in washington using terrorists from mexico. we talked with f.b.i. official john miller and author roya hakakian. >> there were the rivalries between iran and saudi arabia have only become more and more pronounced since the arab spring and since the growing of the tensions between iran and saudi arabia. >> charlie: we colude this evening with a conversation about chinese aunt pureship wang boming president of the stock exchange and executive council and the two partners. >> we solve our problems with the history of china and converse form relations from -- electricity and car. now the two countries work together in a way to get the maximum geration of products to solve the problem we are facing. i think we have this opportunity and also obligation. >> charlie: wall street protests, accusations against iranian officials and chinese entrepreneurship when we continue. >> every story needs a hero we can all root for, who beats the odds and comes out on top. that this isn't just a hollywood story line,t's happening every day all across america. every time a storefront opens or the mnight oil is bur
deals, and they're all about boosting u.s. jobs. >> and this jobs bill, mr. speaker, does not require a tax increase. this jobs bill does not require us to go into debt. and this jobs bill has bipartisian support. >> tom: from boosting jobs through trade to losing jobs on wall street, we look at what job cuts in the world of finance could mean for the u.s. economy. it's "nightly business report" for wednesday, october 12. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. high hopes on wall street today. u.s. investors bought up stocks after european officials rolled out what's seen as the most credible plan so far to prop up european banks. tom? >> tom: susie, the plan was rolled out today by the president of the european commission, jose manuel barrosa. he called on european leaders to act quickly and agree at a meeting in two weeks. here's what he's calling for. europea
>> this is "bbc world news america." license to kill, two men linked to iran are rest in the u.s. after allegedly trying to assassinate the saudi ambassador. it is a plot made for the movies, says the fbi. child sacrifice in uganda. little allen was lucky to survive. >> the man that he claims kidnap him for sacrifice lives in this village. members of this community tell us that they continue to take children and sacrifice them. >> tiny slovakia deals a blow to the massive bureau -- eurozone. can they ever find economic harmony? welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also are around the globe. the plot to assassinate the saudi ambassador was conceived and directed from iran according to u.s. officials. they announced they had broken up the alleged scheme and arrested two men with links to the iranian government. they vow to iran would be held accountable. dodge the alleged plot was to kill this man, the long servings saudi ambassador. the head of the fbi said it sounded like fiction, but the plot was all too real. >> individuals from one country sought to conspire with a dru
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more, cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. war on al qaeda claimed another high- profile kill today-- this time, in yemen. the target was an american imam who preached at mosques in the u.s. before taking up jihad overseas. ray suarez has the story. >> suarez: t
money or your life," you choose to hand your money over. >> tom: and back in the u.s., the economy does more than limp along, taking the threat of recession off the table for now. >> the message is that the economy is still recovering. it's a slow growth recovery, it's a bumpy one, but the recovery is ongoing. >> tom: it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 27. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment. we have good news from both sides of the atlantic ocean today, pushing major stock indices into positive territory for the year. it was a big day of buying for shareholders. the dow rocketed up 339 points to close above 12,000 for the first time since early august. the nasdaq shot up almost 88 points. the s&p 500 rallied more than 42 points. big board volume spiked to just under 1.5 billion sha
-will gestures by israel in order to move negotiations forward. >> michelle, thanks for joining us. in the last few minutes, a number of palestinian prisoners who were released today have arrived in syria. these were the scenes broadcast live on syrian tv at the airport as the prisoners got off their plane to a crowd of cheering well-wishers. under the terms of today's exchange, 40 detainees were immediately deported from palestinian territory. turkey and qatar will also take in some. for the latest on the prisoner swap deal, head to our web site. you will find reaction from families of the thousand or so prisoners due to be exchanged for shalit. and that's all at bbc.com/news. now to libya and the u.s. secretary of state, clinton has held talks with the leaders of libya. at a town hall style meeting, mrs. clinton said she was proud to be standing on the free soil of libya and seeing its future being born. we have this report from tripoli. >> hillary clinton flue into tripoli on a military transporter not her usual american boeing and not equipped to deal with the threat of surface-to-air missi
are arrested in the u.s. after trying to assassinate the saudi ambassador. it is a plot for a movie, says the fbi. child sacrifice, new victims, and one was very lucky to survive. we have a special report. >> the many claims kidnapped him for sacrifice live in this village and were arrested and released without charge, but members of this community say they continue to take children for sacrifice. >> and hidden below the ice of antarctica, a group of scientists are digging deep to find a source of life that has never been seen before. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and elsewhere around the world. a plot to assassinate the saudi ambassador to washington was conceived and directed from iran, according to u.s. officials, who today announced they have broken up the scheme and arrested two men with links to the saudi government. they announced the two charged apparently met members of the mexico drug cartel to carry up the order. and for more on the latest developments, i enjoyed by the bbc's adam brooke. >> they say this was a plot like in a movie. a man according to the charge shee
. the deaths have gotten more gruesome. veracruz used to those -- to boast that it was mexico's safest city. more than 100 people have been killed in the last month. 35 people have been left in the street in daylight. empty homes have been boarded up after they were used as headquarters. >> this is one of more than three locations were more than 30 bodies were found just a few days ago. it is part of a vicious battle that has been taking place, and the marines have now been deployed to the streets of the city which until recently was prepared please save region was perfectly safe. >> many of them are victims of tit-for-tat. speaking out is a rare and dangerous thing to do in mexico, but janet figueroa is prepared to take to clear her father's name. he was a mechanic caught in the crossfire of a gun battle. janet says the state fabricated evidence he was a criminal. and why is this used to be a safe city. i never imagined something like this -- >> this used to be a safe city. i never imagined something like this would happen. we have received threats, but i have to speak out that civilians a
gaddafi. now our guides were keen to show us that he was gone. the spectacle was over and the lines had been drawn. the country was ready to move on. g chips in the new libya. this giant fist once stood in colonel gaddafi's libyan compound. now it has been brought back here to misrata as a sign of their achievement. colonel gaddafi's body is the ultimate war trophy of all, and the five days of wrangling over its burial was a sign of the intensive political positioning that is now going on behind the scenes. >> the defeated loyalists are getting used to a new reality. this man is now a prisoner. he was one of those who prepared muammar gaddafi body for burial. he said the colonel's followers have only one option now. >> everything was clear. now the end of gaddafi means a new life. >> but it is not going to be easy. in misrata, very slowly, life is beginning to get back to normal, as people change from their military fatigues back to civilian clothes. the real revolution starts here, this man told me, after the death of gaddafi. this was a peaceful revolution we started back in february.
drones are used to target terrorists. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks to anita hill about her new book on race and gender, 20 years after she accused then-supreme court nominee clarence thomas of sexual harassment. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on >> if i can symbolize the ability to pursue gender equality, racial equality and to be truthful about our experiences, then absolutely that's what i want to be. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in tru
to impact trading here in the u.s. at the bell, the dow plunged 258 points. the nasdaq lost almost 80 and the s&p fell 32. trading volume starts the week on the heavy side. 1.4 billion shares moving on the big board, 2.5 billion on the nasdaq. >> susie: investors are nervous that this quarter will be just as bad as the last one. as suzanne pratt reports, investors have good reason to be worried. >> reporter: it was not a good start to a month known for stock market crashes and halloween. and, after the carnage to stocks in september, it's no wonder investors are really spooked. so, will this october be a scary one? big board trader jonathan corpina says the change in calendar pages has not improved the outlook for the market.. >> the same mentality that was there last week is now here this week. so, yes, there continues to be pressure on our markets. the markets are very fragile. investors are still very confused as to what the outlook is going to be moving forward. >> reporter: market pros say companies are likely to report reasssuring third-quarter earnings, and those results could
. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. wall street says good riddance to its most volatile quarter since the financial crisis. susie, things ended on a sour note. >> susie: stocks tumbled today, tom, amid new worries about the global recovery. specifically, the latest disagreements between european leaders over how to resolve that region's debt crisis. at the close, the dow lost more than 240 points. the nasdaq fell 65 and the s&p 500 off 30 points. for the week, the dow had three up days ending up 1%. the nasdaq was down for three days off nearly 3% for the week. and the s&p 500 lost 5% since last week. >> tom: the summer swoon came as u.s. investors worried about europe and u.s. politicians fought over spending. for the quarter, the dow, nasdaq and s&p 500 were all down over 12% during the quarter with the s&p taking the biggest hit off over 14%. september was the 500's fifth straight monthly loss. investors were rewarded by playing defense. utilities stocks performed the best up about a half percent. the second best sector lost more than 4%, consumer
live at or below the poverty line, and i will be joined by vicki escarra . we thank you for joining us on night two of the poverty tour. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. one last place to gether with your community. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley, and works to improve financial literacy one question at a time. >> brought to you by the aarp foundation. ♪ >> the w.k. kellogg foundation, improving the lives of vulnerable children. learn more at wkkf.org. ♪ >> helping to build a better future for america's kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. ♪ tavis: in our second part of the poverty tour, we look at the inw pour,or," who used to be the middle class. >> the blues are a personal catastrophe expressed lyrically. >> the white literary blues. >> i teach them in my class. >> the tennessee williams festival. >> me and my wife -- all of us. trying to get here. you have to keep our home. >> the new pouor are the form er middle class. >> i had a job, a family, what people are supposed to have. i have nothin
the mark. alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld joins us with an update. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, october 11. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. a bad start to earnings season-- late today, alcoa posted a skimpy profit that was much lower than expected. the aluminum giant is the first dow component to report and, susie, investors are worried that this a is bad omen for upcoming quarterly results. >> susie: tom, investors were disappointed-- alcoa reported right after the closing bell, and the stock fell more than 3.5% following the earnings release. here's why-- the company earned 15 cents a share in the third quarter, up from a year ago, but seven cents below analysts' estimates. alcoa blamed it on a big drop in aluminum prices and slow economic growth. revenues came in slightly ahead of estimates, up 21% to $6.4 billion. joi
a plot to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s., a scheme that they said was conceived of and sponsored by the iranian government. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the charges and the alleged conspiracy. >> ifill: then we look at opening day in the trial of the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to bring down a u.s. airliner on christmas day 2009. >> brown: we debate the merits of president obama's jobs bill with two senators: michigan democrat carl levin and georgia republican johnny isakson. >> ifill: john merrow examines the dilemma faced by a pennsylvania school system that spent big on a state-of-the-art facility. >> reporter: the economic crisis hit. like rural school districts all across the country, this school had to put its ambitious dreams on hold almost overnight. the challenge became to make ends meet. >> brown: and ray suarez talks to a 94-year-old former french resistance fighter who urges young people to take to the streets and show their outrage. >> ifill: that's all ahead on
. the former president of pakistan gives his frank assessment of where things stand up with the u.s. >> there is a lack of confidence between the u.s. and pakistan. >> get ready, broadway. "chinglish" is coming to town with a new take on language barriers that leaves audiences laughing. welcome to our viewers on pbs and around the globe. the french president calls it a deal that has saved the world from catastrophe. markets around the globe surged after european leaders agreed on a plan to contain the debt crisis. within hours, harmony was broken when mr. sarkozy told french television that greece should never have been allowed to join the eurozone at all. in a moment, the reaction from the greek foreign minister, worst air report from our foreign editor. >> financial markets rose following news europe's leaders have agreed on a plan to fix the eurozone crisis. they did not get all the detail they were looking for, but what they heard exceeded expectations and has fought iraq time to deliver on commitments made. -- and has bought europe time to deliver on commitments made. >> i am v
: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is on assignment tonight. europe and the u.s. economy-- those troublesome issues pressured stocks today. there were conflicting signals today on how close european leaders are on a deal to solve the debt crisis ahead of a crucial summit this weekend. investors are concerned that talks between france and germany have stalled. and in greece, one of the largest demonstrations as people protested a new batch of austerity measures. the greek parliament takes a final vote on the plan tomorrow. also worrying investors? a pessimistic report on the u.s. economy from the federal reserve. its beige book survey of regional economies showed weaker conditions for growth. all that led to a negative close on wall street. the dow lost 72 points, the nasdaq dropped 53 and the s&p slipped 15. earlier in the day, averages were solidly in positive territory. as suzanne pratt reports, today's volatility is a pattern of trading that will be with us for a while. >> reporter: one day we're up. one day we're down. with the u.s. stock market experiencing such wild
's experiment in religious education: the nation's first multi-faith school of theology. >> sock of us are looking in a jewish direction. some of us are looking in a muslim direction. some are looking into n a christian direction and yet we're all looking in a god direction. >> woodruff: plus, different screens for different kids. we look at the "app gap" among the nation's children. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and
is being shipped from the heat -- uganda to the uk for use in witchcraft. and taking a shortcut -- one marathon runner from the 26 miles a bit too much, but taking the bus certainly helped. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also or around the globe. there is heavy fighting in libya denied as troops of the national libyan council push hard into the city intosirte. fighters in the gaddafi stronghold have put up surprisingly fierce resistance, but now, according to bbc reporters who are with forces of the government, there are only a few streets still left in the hands of gaddafi loyalists. >> a war that has lasted nine months across libya has come down to a few streets and suburbs in colonel gaddafi cozy home town. the fighting on the streets of sirte is ferocious and intense. the town is being pummeled and pounded into submission. a place gaddafi favored above all others in libya flattened block by block. after a battle that lasted more than a week, this day began with soldiers from the new government loading their ammunition belts for what they hope will be the last day of f
job prospects and heavy debt loads. u.s. student loan debt could top $1 trillion this year, over taking credit card debt. with so much money at stake, the occupy wall street movement is pushing the idea of debt forgiveness for students. darren gersh looks at whether that idea could really boost the economy. >> reporter: kelly mears says his high school counselors and everyone else in the student loan system told him not to worry about the debt he was taking on. >> they told me to dig my grave, essentially, and you know, really. >> reporter: like many of the students in the occupy wall street movement, mears hasn't been able to find a job, and now he and many other protesters are pressing for relief on their student loans. >> i think interest should be forgiven, at the very least. i would like to see student loan debt forgiven, i think it would actually be a huge economic boost. and for our generation-- a whole generation of people it would re-empower them. >> reporter: but analysts say that empowerment would be expensive. >> i'm sure we all feel that we deserve forgiveness. >> r
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